02.03.2024

Britain’s first menopause education programme launched by experts in bid

Experts are launching the UK’s first menopause education programme to help women understand changes their bodies go through. Research suggests that more than 90 per cent of women were never taught about the menopause at school, while nearly two-thirds only started looking for information when they began to experience symptoms.

A campaign launched by the Daily Mail last year called for more women to be made aware of treatment options.

Now, a team from University College London (UCL), with the support of the charities Wellbeing of Women and Sophia Forum, are designing a course intended to do just that.

Called The National Menopause Education and Support Programme, attendees on the course will receive up-to-date and evidence-based menopause education from trained healthcare professionals.

Research suggests that more than 90 per cent of women were never taught about the menopause at school

It will be led by Professor Joyce Harper, Dr Shema Tariq and Dr Nicky Keay, and has the support of the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists and the British Menopause Society.

‘Research has shown that women are currently poorly educated about the menopause and often go into it not understanding what to expect,’ Professor Harper said.

‘Some menopausal symptoms can cause psychological issues and women may mistake their symptoms for mental health issues or other concerning causes, and this can have a negative effect on their wellbeing.

‘We want to ensure that all women get the information they need to manage the changes they experience in this part of their life, in the best way possible.’

The team said they will keep the price of the programme low so it is accessible to everyone, and will work with companies so they can offer the course to employees.

A campaign launched by the Daily Mail last year called for more women to be made aware of treatment options

A campaign launched by the Daily Mail last year called for more women to be made aware of treatment options

Janet Lindsay, CEO of Wellbeing of Women, said: ‘We’re thrilled to be part of this exciting new project to improve menopause education, and we welcome the research approach of co-designing with the voices of women affected.

‘Every woman deserves access to high-quality information and menopause support, yet as research from Professor Harper shows, too many women haven’t been given the knowledge they desperately need and deserve.

‘We hope this work will empower a generation of women to understand the changes to their bodies during menopause and access help to manage their symptoms.’

Work to develop the programme will start at UCL in September.

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